In Search of England: Whitstable Oyster Festival

Whitstable Oyster Co. stall

Sells local oysters, from small oysters to jumbo oysters the size of my face

A colleague recommended the Whitstable Oyster Festival to me this year, and having been I can confirm that it was worth the 2 hour drive from our home in East Sussex. Do pay a visit to the Whitstable Oyster Festival if you like to spend your Saturdays driving through the garden of England, relaxing on the beach, listening to live bands, and eating fresh seafood.

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In Search of England: Her Majesty’s Official 90th Birthday Parade

Trooping the Colour
It’s almost Her Majesty’s birthday again, thus also Trooping the Colour, and here is my guide* to watching the day’s events in front of Buckingham Palace, with thanks to the lady who stood beside me – my “neighbour” – when I went in 2016 for her 90th official birthday. It was my first time spectating, and I had a good enough time that the Queen, touch wood, should see me for her 100th birthday!

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In Search of England: Lewes Bonfire Night

Burning tar in Lewes

Bonfire boys pulling carts of burning tar, waiting for the processions in Lewes to begin.

Bonfire Night is on Saturday this year, and where better to head than to Lewes, where one of the country’s oldest bonfire festivities are still celebrated every year? The Lewes Bonfire is held annually on 5th November, the anniversary of the Gunpowder Plot, but Bonfire Night is not just about Guido Fawkes. The Sussex bonfire tradition originated from the Tudor times and commemorates Protestant martyrs as well as protests against unpopular figures and events. Fire processions were seen as dangerous expressions of the common people – in 1847 magistrates who read the Riot Act to the bonfire boys in Lewes were thrown into the river Ouse. Some still held processions illegally though, chanting “we wunt be druv” (“we won’t be driven”), and thanks to them the Lewes Bonfire Night is still celebrated to this day. It is the largest event of its kind in the county, and the largest in the country in terms of the number of people involved in organising and parading. I went to see the spectacle last year, on its 410th anniversary and would heavily recommend it – if you’re able to go despite the Southern Rail strikes, that is. Remember no trains are running to Lewes on the day of the event this year. On a normaly year however, around 50,000 people attend the event, so here’s how to make sense of the crush.

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It’s been a month since I left The Pigeonhole, a digital publishing start-up, so for Throwback Thursday I’m going to recount my unexpected moments there:

  • Stroking a taxidermied pigeon.
  • Setting a lunch trend.
  • Encountering questionable websites in my media list research.
  • Trying to concentrate with a dog’s head heating up my lap.
  • Arguing over Brexit with everyone but the dog.
  • Receiving a photo of a newborn baby in an email.
  • Eating “the best falafel in London”.