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I can’t believe my time at Oxford is almost over, and also that my exams are almost upon me, and so I’ll spend the next few weeks posting about food in Oxford with material that I’ve compiled from times past.

The term ‘molecular gastronomy’ (or ‘molecular and physical gastronomy’ as it was first called) was coined by a Hungarian physicist Nicholas Kurti from the University of Oxford and the French chemist Hervé This from the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique.

A student at Queen’s College was attacked on Christmas Day by a wild boar. His only weapon at hand was a copy of Aristotle, so he shoved the book down the boar’s throat. Afterwards, he wanted his book back, so he cut off the animal’s head and brought it back to the college where it was served for Christmas dinner, kickstarting the tradition of eating boar’s head for Christmas. I was dubious about the truth behind this story, but my friend from Queen’s says it’s true!

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The Twelve Days of Christmas: A Culinary Extravaganza

Here are recipes and other ideas for the Christmas kitchen leading up to the Christmas week. Hope one takes your fancy! Continue reading

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Last Saturday I went inside the Knowledge Emporium sweets van, which had been parked in Gloucester Green as part of Oxford’s Christmas Lights Festival. I got a sweet for my thoughts: a piece of knowledge, to be scribbled down in their Big Book of Everything We Know. Actually, I got a sundae-cup-full. The next day they read out some of the entries in the square. As for my favourite sweet, well you’ve probably heard of lime flavoured chocolate but have you heard of chocolate flavoured limes? I hadn’t, and they’re delicious! They are lime-flavoured boiled sweets with a chocolate fondant centre. Mmmm….